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  1. #41
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    <div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (Sprinkles @ Jan 1 2010, 01:55 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}></div><div class='quotemain'>Candide, Voltaire
    Kafka

    The Will to Power, Nietzsche
    Discourses, Epictetus
    On Dreams, Freud
    Psychology and the East, Jung</div>


    If you're not reading it already, I strongly suggest searching out a 3rd edition (1st english edition) of the Freud. For some stupid reason subsequent editions omit the bulk of Freud's footnotes, which are IMHO the most valuable part of the work.

  2. #42
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    What is the best translation for Kafka, specifically The Trial?

  3. #43
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    <div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (Marc McDougal @ Dec 21 2009, 04:07 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}></div><div class='quotemain'>Outliers-Gladwell
    Bright Lights Big City-Jay McInerney
    Lunar Park- Bret Easton Ellis
    Drunkards Walk-Leonard Mlodinow

    Any thoughts on those books, and, what are you freaks reading?</div>

    Lunar Park is awesome. I finished that not too long ago. Definitely different from typical Ellis, but pretty damn good nonethless. He's got real talent, man. That Turby doll is freakin creepy.

    Bright Lights, Big City is pretty synergistic with Lunar Park, seeing that Jay is actually a character in the novel. It was a little hard for me to adjust to the narrative in second-person form, but it was pretty good nonetheless. Really captured the essence of losing it all but at the very end finding just a little slimmer of light to hold on to for inspiration.

    Gladwell is cool because he always offer a unique perspective on things. Always stimulating.

    I thought Freakonomics sucked. IMO, being trained as an economist, I think anything that degrades economics to finding out about whether sumo wrestlers cheat or not is completely useless. Seriously, which is more important: our monetary policy to help create jobs and prevent inflation, or finding out that crack dealers exhibit some sort of miniature economy. The latter is an exercise is wasting-time. It's a disgrace that NYT offered them a blog.

    That being said, if you like macroeconomics (the important stuff) check out Paul Krugman's Return of Depression Economics for illuminating how-it-happened narratives about Japan's twenty year recession, the Thai baht crisis that ruined Long-Term Capital Management, and more. It's a good read and thankfully, Krugman omits the punditry he exhibits on his NYT blog.


  4. #44
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    <div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (Colin @ Dec 21 2009, 12:36 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}></div><div class='quotemain'>I'm reading Preacher by Garth Ennis and Steve Dillon (again).It's a comic book series but a damn good one at that.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Preacher_(comics)

    Last book I read was a Hard Case Crime novel by Andrew Vacchs.Just about any novel from this imprint should provide for a night's entertainmentmost are 200 pages or so,all of them have a strong pulp fiction noir feel to them.The most well known and classic kick ass crime/noir novelists have contributed new work e.g. Donald Westlake,Mickey Spillane.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hard_case_crime</div>

    Hahaha, preacher??!! man, that brings me back to my HS comic nerd days.

  5. #45
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    <div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (ozzman @ Dec 22 2009, 02:12 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}></div><div class='quotemain'>Re: The Road
    Good read, like all his other stuff it paints a bleak picture, but it is very engaging</div>

    Engaging? Man, I bought that one at an airport when I had 3 hours to kill. That put me to sleep FAST. One of the few books of mine that wound its way into a trashcan. I thought they were crazy to make a movie out of this book which has the most meandering plot I've ever witnessed.

  6. #46
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    <div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (Sprinkles @ Jan 3 2010, 11:14 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}></div><div class='quotemain'>What is the best translation for Kafka, specifically The Trial?</div>

    The answer to that is always "it depends," especially in the case of a writer like Kafka, but for my purposes I would say the hands-down answer is the Mitchell translation. IMHO, the problem with Kafka is that too many people tried to make too much of what he was trying to do, channeling his writings through the lens of their own biases and agendas, when the ostensible point of Kafka's prose was to illuminate the absurdity of trying to find meaning in the madness in the first place. So I think that a literal-in-the-Allan-Bloom-sense translation of his texts is best, a translation that works against stressing any theme, because that seems to have been contrary to the author's own intention.

    The funny thing is that someone actually just demonstrated that his prose is potent in precisely that sense, for better or for worse; the researchers subjected students to a reading of one of his clearly non-sensical works, and then compared their ability to parse artificial grammar against that of a control group. The people who were primed with Kafka out-performed the control group. The researchers' interpretation was that the non-sensical text basically primed the brain's syntactic parsing mechanisms so that they were running on over-drive when the participants were presented with the artificial grammar challenge, which I think makes sense... my own added two cents being that the caveat to this is that in a real life scenario it's person-dependent whether the person who reads his works walks away and tries to find meaning outside of the System or, ironically, turns towards the System that's opposed to meaning in the first place. You wind up with college kids who take it as a moral imperative to fight the System, instead of learning to dance the political dance while laughing at the impotence of the corruption itself.

    BTW, I'd recommend the recent English translation of Jung's Red Book, for the same reason as the early edition of the Freud... it depicts the evolution of his thought process rather than just the conclusions, which at this point have been filtered through so many iterations of social dissemination that it's hard to understand them in his own language. Jung's actual discussion of Eastern religions is horrible from a factual standpoint (cf. also his treatment of Kundalini), but, like Freud's Totem and Taboo, there's a lot of valuable insight to be gleaned if looked at from an analytic rather than anthropological perspective.

  7. #47
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    Black Sun Rising, C.S. Friedman

  8. #48
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    Sperm Wars
    Rebuild.

  9. #49
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    <div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (sword- @ Jan 5 2010, 01:42 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}></div><div class='quotemain'>Sperm Wars</div>

    I strongly recommend following this up with Brett Kahr's "Who's Been Sleeping In Your Head," for a much-needed complementary perspective.

  10. #50
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    Two year bump. What are you reading right now?

    Candide, Voltaire
    Game of Thrones, George R R Martin

    Just finished The Magicians and the Magician King, Lev Grossman

    Waiting for me are:
    all 4 other George RR Martin books but first I'll hit
    The Prague Cemetery by Umberto Eco

  11. #51
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    I'm not sure if I'm supposed to like these books, but The Hunger Games books aren't bad at all. My wife started reading them and raved about them-which is usually a sign that I should run and hide-but I'm almost done with the 3rd book. I think this type of book is good for anyone who likes Dune-like fantasy books with revolution, bloodshed, and other interesting plot stuff.

  12. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by GaWd View Post
    I'm not sure if I'm supposed to like these books, but The Hunger Games books aren't bad at all. My wife started reading them and raved about them-which is usually a sign that I should run and hide-but I'm almost done with the 3rd book. I think this type of book is good for anyone who likes Dune-like fantasy books with revolution, bloodshed, and other interesting plot stuff.
    OK I admit it. I read them and they are pretty engaging

  13. #53
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    Phew. If you've read them and can admit it, I feel like less of a skirt.

  14. #54
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    Heritage by Paolini has me pretty enthralled right now. I've been following the series since it came out.

  15. #55
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    I have heard good things about The Hunger Games from people whose literary opinions I respect, so I plan on reading them at some point.

    Books I just recently finished:
    Kitchen Confidential- Bourdain
    Liars Poker- Lewis
    Brothers Karamoz- Dostoevsky
    Thinking Fast, Thinking Slow- Kahneman

    I am currently reading, More Money than God: Hedge Funds and the Making of a New Elite- Mallaby

  16. #56
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    Oh cool, a reading thread. Yeah well, 'cuz of my studies I read a lot recently. Mostly literature about economics, a little bit philosophy (Power & Moral, Ethics like Niccolo Machiavelli, Nietzsche, Max Weber, Aristotle, Thomas von Aquin). And of course some books about nutrition and training.

    High Frequency Training by C.Zippel
    How to unlock your mucle gene by Ori Hofmekler
    You are your own gym by Mark Lauren (the German version)

    and currently I am on "Live Life aggressively" by Mike Mahler (not your everyday advisor-/guide book - a little orthodox in my opinion xD)

  17. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by FurorGermanicus View Post
    ,,,High Frequency Training by C.Zippel
    How to unlock your mucle gene by Ori Hofmekler
    You are your own gym by Mark Lauren (the German version)...
    Can you give us a quick review of these? Are they any good?
    J

  18. #58
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    Yeah well, I wanted to review this books anyway on my own blog - but this won't help you, because it will be written in german language. ^^ But I can write a few lines. First off to "How to unlock your muscle gene" by Ori. That's kinda special because I am a huge fan of Ori himself. I have read his other books (The Warrior Diet, Maximum Muscle, Minimum Fat) and this one is somewhat minimalstically written, but still pretty good. There is no big chit-chat around the topics but a straight and direct line from chapter to chapter. As far as I have it is (as used by Ori) pretty straight forward with a lot of scientifical information (the resources part in the end of the books lists a huge load of studies). A huge con is however, that Ori doesn't work with footnotes, so you have to piece the studies on yourself together. Its a pretty good outline of the other books he has written without the big talk.

    Contrary to that is "HFT" by Christian Zippel. Its written pretty flowerly with a good dash of philosophy (he often cites Friedrich Nietzsche) but I guess thats because a lot of the material has been formely written in his blog as own articles. A sum up of his experience mixed with empirical examples. He talks about training regimen of powerlifters and the bulgarian olympic weight lifting team coached by Ivan Abadjiev. His approach on high frequency training is therefore not a scientific one, but rather empirical grounded. Yeah, what to say about this one? If you like your books neat and clean on theoretical hypothesis, then HFT by Zippel is the wrong answer. To tell you the truth: his writing style is not very good, but the content makes up for it. And as a matter of fact I just started my own ŽautoregulatedŽ training as described in the book. So, lifting everyday (subjective) heavy weights on common basis.

    I bought "YAYOG" by Lauren (or as released in Germany by the title "Fit ohne Geräte"), because I wanted to have a decent pool of body weight exercises in one single book - so, if you go on a vacation trip or if you don't have time to hit the gym, you still can perform a challenging workout. While the chapters at the beginning (training, proper nutrition and stuff) don't seem to teach anything new to intermediate sportsmen, the latter part make it up. There are over 125 BWEs (without the variations!), so it is a pretty good almanac. If you are into body weight exercises this might be a good read

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    American Sniper.

  20. #60
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    Reading Zen and the art of motorcycle maintenance. So far so good.

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